Hired a Temp? How Long Should Your Trial Employment Last?

April 27th, 2016

There is no doubt that temporary and contract employees are able to provide valuable support when your company needs it most. They are an ideal option when project needs are high but long-term resources are uncertain. Many temporary workers seek out contract work as it provides them with the opportunity to develop their skills, their network, and their resume in a relatively short period of time; not to mention temporary work can help pay the bills while they continue their search for a more permanent opportunity.

Given that temporary work is such a convenient opportunity, why then are there often hesitancies (both from employers and employees) to rely too heavily on short-term contracts? How long should an ideal trial period last before bringing a temporary worker on board permanently? These are all questions that employers are eager to answer, and in today’s article, we discuss the key issues.

Timing is Everything

The need for contract workers often stems from uncertainty in a company. This uncertainty can be due to a structural reorganization, budget ambiguity, or even a lack of qualified professionals in the job market. The result is the same: there is a need to find workers who can support business and project needs while holding off on a long-term hiring commitment. A good length of time for a temporary contract can be anywhere from 6 to 18 months, with some erring on the shorter side to avoid any conflict.

Getting the most from your temporary hires is all about timing. While it really is up to the employer to set the length of a contract, there is also a mental limit that most temporary workers are willing to remain under contract before expecting to be brought on full time. Recognizing that your short-term needs may not directly align with their long-term career goals is important, and seeking ways to bring the two perspectives into a mutually beneficial balance is key to a successful contract hire.

The Dangers of Hiring Too Early

It is true that employers can hire their temporary staff too early. Such situations can result in a bad hire when waiting a little longer could have resulted in a more informed decision. Don’t let the pressures of a competitive hiring market or urgency felt by an individual worker overly influence your decision-making process. Take the time you need to evaluate whether they will really be a good fit for the position and the team in a more long-term capacity before making them an offer of permanent employment.

The Dangers of Hiring Too Late

On the other hand, waiting too long to hire a high-quality temporary worker can result in frustration on the side of the employer or even legal action if contractors are misclassified and treated as an employee. If you don’t want your valued temporary staff to leave for another opportunity, wasting precious time and money invested in their training, and you want the piece of mind that comes with lower exposure to legal sanctions, consider bringing the employee on full time before it’s too late.

For more insight into hiring the best temporary talent in your area, contact the staffing experts at Search Staffing Group today!

The Biggest Danger of Hiring Temps

April 5th, 2016

Many employers recognize the value of recruiting temporary workers. In fact, according to the American Staffing Association, more than three million temporary and contract employees work for staffing companies across the U.S. on any given week. They provide on-demand assistance when you need it most and often with limited training and ramp-up time. Working through a staffing agency such as Search Staffing makes the process more streamlined and helps you identify and attract the top industry talent during times of need. But there are some dangers you should be aware of when hiring temps. Today’s article discusses such hazards and provides some solutions that can help you sidestep any potential negative impacts associated with temporary hires.

The Nature of Temp Work

Employers and candidates often rely on temporary contracts to hold them over in times of need, but both sides of the equation are often looking for a more invested contract for the long term. As an employer, it is important to recognize that most temp workers are looking for full-time employment. Temporary work is a great opportunity for candidates to gain experience in their field, to contribute to exciting projects and build their resumes, but the short-term nature of the work is often not ideal for an employee’s five- or ten-year career goals.

From an employer’s perspective, temporary workers provide the on-demand support many high-pressure projects or seasons within the industry require. Short-term contracts are also an excellent way to give applicants a trial run to see if they are able to meet expectations. The danger for employers of temporary workers is often in the potential loss of a really great hire should they begin to take their temporary workforce for granted. Leaning too heavily on temporary workers without committing to hiring the great candidates in a more long-term capacity sets employers up for a potential financial loss as their all-stars eventually get frustrated and move on to another opportunity.

The Financial Investment

As is true with any new hire, temporary workers require a certain amount of time and training to fully settle into a new job.  Furthermore, recruiting employees often has an upfront cost whether that may be a signing bonus or staffing agency fees. Each new hire (temporary or otherwise) requires a financial investment from the employer on the front end making the short-term nature of temporary workers that much more expensive in the long run.

The danger in relying on temporary workers is tied directly to whether you are able to convert them to a permanent position within your company. A good rule of thumb is to hire a temporary worker within 3-6 months of their original start date. This is frankly because you can expect them to be receiving calls from recruiters and actively pursuing other jobs while they are working for you. Taking a temp on directly is definitely an option. If a temp proves to be a worthwhile hire, and if they have settled into a position enough to provide value to their employer, letting all of that training go to waste, only to have them leave for another opportunity, is a loss of time and money.

For more insight into hiring the best temporary talent in your area, contact the staffing experts at Search Staffing Group today!